Wildlife state of flagging shocking report by UN

UN Report On Wildlife

The global extinction risk for wildlife migratory species is increasing, even for those that are not on the CMS list; just 51% of the major biodiversity regions that are crucial for the survival of migratory species on the CMS list have protected status.

Vishal: Hey Mahendra, have you seen the latest UN report on the state of wildlife? It’s pretty alarming!

Mahendra: No, I haven’t. What does it say?

Vishal: Well, it highlights the shocking decline in global wildlife populations. At the start of a significant UN wildlife conservation conference (CMS COP14), the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), a UN biodiversity treaty, released the first-ever State of the World’s Migratory Species, which has unearthed some shocking data.

Mahendra: That’s terrible! What kind of human activities are causing this decline?

Vishal: The report identifies several factors, including habitat destruction, climate change, pollution, and overexploitation of natural resources.

The momentous report reveals that while some migratory wildlife species listed under CMS are improving, more than half (44%) are experiencing population declines, and nearly all (97%) of CMS-listed fish are under threat of extinction.

Additionally, the extinction risk is increasing for migratory species worldwide, including those not listed under CMS, and half (51%) of key biodiversity areas identified as important for migratory animals listed under CMS do not have protected status. Finally, unsustainable levels of pressure resulting from human activity are present at 58% of monitored locations that CMS has identified as significant for migratory species.

Mahendra: It’s sad to see how we destroy the ecosystems that sustain us and other species. What can we do to address this crisis?

Vishal: The report emphasizes the urgent need for conservation efforts and sustainable practices. We need to protect and restore habitats, reduce pollution, and adopt more responsible consumption patterns.

Mahendra: The two biggest risks to all migratory wildlife species, including those on the CMS list, are habitat loss brought on by human activities and overexploitation. Seven out of ten CMS-listed species are affected by overexploitation, including purposeful taking and unintentional capture. Three out of every four CMS-listed species are affected by habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation.

Vishal: Significant effects on wildlife’s migratory species are also being caused by pollution, invasive species, and climate change. There are now 399 migratory species worldwide that are vulnerable or very close to being extinct but are not included in the CMS.

There has never before been a thorough analysis of migratory species like this one. Together with the most recent data on the primary dangers facing migratory species and the effective measures taken to protect them, the study offers a global overview of the conservation status and population trends of these creatures.

Mahendra: The research released today “unequivocally demonstrates how unsustainable human activity is endangering migratory species, which are vital to the stability and functionality of the planet’s intricate ecosystems as well as serving as markers of environmental change.” stated Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme.

The international community has a chance to put this most recent research on the challenges migratory species face into practice by taking practical conservation measures. We can’t afford to wait given the vulnerable circumstances facing many of these creatures; therefore, we must cooperate to see that the suggestions are implemented.

Vishal: Every year, billions of animals migrate over continents and national borders, travelling thousands of kilometres worldwide in search of food and mates. They also migrate over rivers, oceans, and the sky. Because they carry important nutrients, pollinate plants, hunt pests, and aid in the storage of carbon, migratory animals are crucial to the upkeep of global ecosystems.

Mahendra: The CMS State of the World’s Wildlife Migratory Species Report was created by conservation scientists at the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). It incorporates expert contributions from organizations such as BirdLife International, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and makes use of the most comprehensive species data sets available worldwide.

Vishal: The research primarily focuses on the 1,189 wildlife animal species that are classified under CMS and have been recognized by CMS Parties as needing international protection. It also includes analysis related to nearly 3,000 additional migratory species that are not under CMS. The Convention lists species that are endangered in all or most of their range or that require concerted international action to improve their conservation status.

Mahendra: “The wildlife migration species rely on a variety of specific habitats at different times in their lifecycles,” stated Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary of CMS. They frequently travel thousands of kilometres to get to these locations. Along the voyage, when they arrive at their breeding or feeding grounds, they must face several obstacles and predators.

Vishal: When a species crosses national boundaries, all of the countries where it is located must work together to ensure its survival. This important analysis will support much-needed legislative changes to guarantee the global survival of migratory species.

Mahendra: It sounds like a daunting task, but we can’t afford to ignore it. We need to take action now to preserve biodiversity for future generations.

Vishal: Absolutely! And it’s not just about saving species; it’s also about safeguarding our well-being. Healthy ecosystems provide essential services like clean air, water, and food.

Mahendra: True. We’re all interconnected, and the loss of biodiversity has far-reaching consequences for human society as well.

Vishal: Exactly. That’s why governments, businesses, and individuals must work together to address this issue. We need coordinated action at local, national, and global levels.

Mahendra: I agree. But sometimes it feels like the problem is so big that our efforts won’t make much of a difference.

Vishal: That’s a common concern, but every action counts. Whether it’s reducing our carbon footprint, supporting conservation organizations, or advocating for policy change, we can all contribute in meaningful ways.

Mahendra: You’re right. We need to focus on what we can do rather than feeling overwhelmed by the scale of the problem.

Vishal: Absolutely. And let’s not forget the power of education and raising awareness. The more people know about the importance of biodiversity, the more likely they are to take action.

Mahendra: That’s a great point. We need to start conversations, share information, and inspire others to join the effort.

Vishal: And let’s not forget about holding governments and corporations accountable for their actions. We need policies and regulations that prioritize conservation and sustainability.

Mahendra: Agreed. It’s time for decision-makers to prioritize the health of our planet over short-term profits.

Vishal: Definitely. This crisis requires bold and decisive action. We can’t afford to delay any longer.

Mahendra: Well said, Vishal. Let’s do our part to protect wildlife and preserve the natural world for future generations.

Vishal: Absolutely, Mahendra. Together, we can make a difference.

The world is facing unprecedented environmental challenges, and conversations like Vishal and Mahendra’s are crucial. By raising awareness, inspiring action, and advocating for change, we can work towards a more sustainable future where both humans and wildlife can thrive. It’s up to all of us to take responsibility and protect the precious biodiversity of our planet.

Dear Readers,

If you wish to read our other blogs, LK Advani Conferred Bharat Ratna

If you wish to read a blog from another website, UN Report on Wildlife

FAQ

1. What is the UN Report on Wildlife?

The global extinction risk for wildlife migratory species is increasing, even for those that are not on the CMS list; just 51% of the major biodiversity regions that are crucial for the survival of migratory species on the CMS list have protected status.

2. How many species are under the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) program?

The research primarily focuses on the 1,189 wildlife animal species that are classified under CMS and have been recognized by CMS Parties as needing international protection.

3. What is the statement by Amy Fraenkel?

“The wildlife migration species rely on a variety of specific habitats at different times in their lifecycles,” stated Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary of CMS. They frequently travel thousands of kilometres to get to these locations.

Leave a Reply

Scroll to Top